The Daily Reel: March 5, 2012

  • iStock 000000081278Medium5 300x300 The Daily ReelEconomic Analysis Shows Sharks Are Worth More Alive Than Dead
  • Gulf Fishermen Settle With BP Over Deepwater Horizon Spill for $7.8 Billion
  • Miami Marlins’ New Ballpark Features Real Fish Aquariums Behind Home Plate

 

Economic Analysis Shows Sharks Are Worth More Alive Than Dead

A doctoral student from the University of Miami shared information from a study he and his doctoral advisor conducted last year that determined the average shark was 40 percent more valuable over the course of its life than the one-time value it holds for its fins or its meat. Just one shark pursued more for the interests of eco-tourism than immediate cash value from its slaughter was calculated to be worth about $200,000. Since the paper’s publishing, the student has received at least one email that his research is being used to stop shark harvesting in dive communities abroad.

Gulf Fishermen Settle With BP Over Deepwater Horizon Spill for $7.8 Billion

Roughly 100,000 fishermen whose livelihoods were severely impacted by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 have settled a class-action lawsuit against oil giant BP to the tune of 7.8 billion dollars. Despite Gulf fishermen dropping litigation in exchange for the settlement, BP is still involved in civil litigation with the US government over damages and liability. Some have speculated that although the payout could have been significantly higher if the case had gone to trial, fishermen were advised to bear in mind the battle royale between Exxon and Alaska fishermen over a 1989 oil spill that spanned over 20 years, and to avoid any similar troubles. Individuals will still be allowed to sue BP over their losses from the 2010 oil spill, but experts do not believe payouts for those cases will be substantial.

Miami Marlins’ New Ballpark Features Real Fish Aquariums Behind Home Plate

The Miami Marlins have a new baseball park, and with that, a whole new feature that is unique to their stadium: live fish aquariums situated behind home plate. The aquariums are constructed from “unbreakable” clear acrylic panels over one inch thick, with an extra layer of thick glass in front of the tanks. To test the durability of the tank walls, first baseman Gaby Sanchez threw a ball as hard as he could against the tank, resulting in absolutely no change inside or outside the tank whatsoever. Check out a clip of the new aquarium here:

Leave a Reply